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Sacred & Profane

St Bee's Priory, near Whitehaven
13 July 2013

Having just returned from the York Early Music festival I was only too glad to get a top up from the Wordsworth Singers at St Bees Priory. In spite of Clément Janequin's prolific output his name doesn't appear as often as you would expect on programmes so a double dose in this performance was very welcome. Janequin was known for the popularity of his music in his own day and the first piece, Cries of Paris, launched us full-throated into the Paris streets with its bustle and activity with male and female voices playing off each other.

The words to the second piece Sweet Hawthorn Green describing the many different types of creatures living on it were so absorbing that the singing became a background to my own musings and I almost forgot to listen, a suitable experience for musical entertainment though. This composer is known for his mimicking of birds and animals and the Song of the Lark captured the chattering and scolding of the Lark rather well. Once again the words were fascinating, if a bit off the wall. The more conventional words of The Nightingale were carried by the soaring sopranos but the lower registers which are not given much prominence in the score could have done with a bit more synchronisation to create the repetitive "words" of the Nightingale.

Jehan Alain was the modern composer (1911-1940) of the organ piece played by the Wordsworth Singers' director Mark Hindley erroneously believed to be based on a theme by Janequin. I have to admit a fault here and that is I find little organ music that is engaging however skilfully performed. There were some pleasurable moments in the second movement and in the last few bars where the upper registers had a bell-like clarity. The programme continued with more Janequin sounds with The Song of the Birds and The War. The former piece lacked the cohesion one normally expects from the Wordsworth Singers but it all came together with the lovely last verse on the Cuckoo. The War again took some time to come together and the plosives could have been stronger but when it did it was worth the wait and the final verse on Victory was indeed.

You can't beat a good Kyrie to draw you into a Mass and so it was after the interval with the Missa de la Batalla Escoutez by Francisco Guerrero. There is no doubt that the religious authorities of the time would have thought of this luscious introduction as "iffy" for the sopranos carried us off leaving us unconcerned by the meaning of the words. The Gloria climbed eventually with the upper registers vying with the rich depth of the lower voices. The Mass finished as always with the Agnus Dei with those lucky sopranos soaring away above the pillow of the tenors and basses all coming together with a delightful finish.

I should add a compliment on the programme notes - quite the best I've read for a long time.

Alan Alexander